Dr. Doom : The Madman in the Iron Mask

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Dr.Doom 2Any of you guys been to see the Fantastic Four[1]Fantastic Four bio courtesy of Marvel yet? It’s the only Marvel film so far that I haven’t seen at some point during release week. I’ve been pretty busy, I was sceptical from the original trailers and after having heard more about it following release I’ve been thoroughly put off using my time to see it at the cinema. It’s a shame really, the Fantastic Four comics were great and they’ve yet to be done justice in a film adaptation.

At some point I fully intend to cover the Fantastic Four and their exposure to cosmic rays but for the moment I’m on a little bit of a villain kick. I want to talk about Reed Richards'[2]Mr. Fantastic bio courtesy of Marvel personal nemesis and rival superscientist, Victor von Doom.[3]Dr. Doom bio courtesy of Marvel Doom was born in Latveria to a gypsy healer and a gypsy witch woman but given they both died when he was a child, he was actually raised by a friend of his father. Despite the fact he was educated by gypsies and never attended school, Victor became a scientific genius. Unfortunately, he also developed a taste for the black arts.

Fast forward in time and somehow news of his scientific genius has spread to America where he’s offered a scholarship to study at State University. Coincidentally, the same university Richards will be in attendance at. Thus Doom and Richards scientific rivalry began. The archnemesis part comes along when Doom, driven by some need to contact his dead mother, builds an interdimensional communication device to bridge the gap between the living and the dead. His design is sadly flawed and although Richards attempts to inform von Doom of his mistakes, the latter has no interest in listening resulting in the explosion of the machine and the initial scarring of his face. Unfortunately for Doom, State University frowns on machines used to communicate with the dead and he ends up expelled, as well as scarred. As far as Doom is concerned it’s all Richards fault; blaming him for sabotage and the instigation of his dismissal causing the two to become bitter enemies. [4]Fantastic Four #5, July 1962

Following this von Doom travelled to Tibet, where he came into possession of his famous body armour and mask. While Richards completed his Ph.D., von Doom chose to partake in demonic studies and achieved his goal of revenge in Latveria by overthrowing the countries tyrannical ruler and installing himself as absolute dictator. Ultimately, this gave him the diplomatic immunity he needed to become a plague on the Fantastic Four without consequences.

In the forty plus years that von Doom has been relentlessly seeking his revenge on Richards, his costume has remained unchanged. Even in the world of comic books that is a very long time to have no revamp. His outer garments consist of a green jerkin with a black belt, a matching green hood and a green cloak. His signature iron mask is a grim parody of a human face with the mouthpiece constructed into a permanent menacing grin. The armour in his outfit is the important part in all of this though. This armour is what keeps him alive in even the most nail biting of circumstances.

Body armour has been in existence since the beginning of time in some form or another. Given the leaps in the technology behind weaponry, armour has had to try and keep up throughout the years and with the introduction of more advanced guns the introduction of bulletproof vests was inevitable. A modern day bulletproof vest doesn’t consist of metal but instead high-tech fibers woven together to create what is known as soft body armour. Presumably this is what Doom wears underneath his iron-plated armour.

Now I know what you’re thinking. How can something soft stop a bullet? Well, this armour works on the principle of spreading energy at the point of impact of a bullet over a wide area. Effectively, soft body armour[5]Full explanation of how soft body armour works works like a net.

Flexible Kevlar sheet, illustrating the interlocking structure.

Flexible Kevlar sheet, illustrating the interlocking structure.

Kevlar, a lightweight fibre five times stronger than a strand of steel, is woven together to form an extremely dense interlocking pattern that it’s almost impossible for a regular bullet to penetrate. The bullet hits and much like a ball hitting the back of the goal, the energy is dispersed from the point of impact. It’s like a ripple; your stone hits the water at the epicentre and the energy of the impact is dispersed outwards in little waves. While this is the case, the momentum from a speeding bullet is generally more than powerful enough to break bones and a single layer of netting isn’t going to be enough to stop that. To this end, most bulletproof vests are made of multiple layers of Kevlar and plastic film and have pockets able to hold ceramic or metal plates. Sadly, as I said before it’s only almost impossible to penetrate. Tungsten core bullets are going to rip right through everything von Doom has. That is assuming that the guess of using soft body armour is correct.

More than once in the comics run, von Doom has been depicted performing amazing feats; he’s lifted enormous amounts of weight and survived the unsurvivable. So what if it’s not simply body armour? What if von Doom is in actual fact sporting an advanced human exoskeleton suit?

NK_Exoskeleton_BA human exoskeleton suit is a robotic device that can be strapped on or attached directly to the human body. This kind of machinery is quite common in the Marvel universe, with groups such as AIM and HYDRA equipping their mercenaries with high-tech exoskeleton suits to add muscle power.

January 2001 saw the U.S. Defence Advance Research Projects Agency (DARPA) award contracts to laboratories and experimental groups to take the first crack at developing exoskeleton suits for military use. The early work sponsored by DARPA involved pneumatic muscles or deformable magnets to power artificial limbs or suits that soldiers could wear[6]Pneumatic artificial muscles. As the research developed exoskeletons were created that were capable of propelling its user at speeds greater than 15 miles per hour, could lift 250 pounds as though it was nothing and even suits that gave disabled people the ability to walk again. Today, Japan have jumped to the forefront of human exoskeleton suit development with working suits in use on factory floors and in medical facilities[7]Article outlining recent human exoskeleton developments.

It’s not difficult to imagine a young von Doom pitching his pioneering exoskeleton research to the governments and big corporations of the Marvel universe and walking away with the state of the art technology that would explain his uncanny ability to withstand things no ordinary human ever could.

References   [ + ]

1. Fantastic Four bio courtesy of Marvel
2. Mr. Fantastic bio courtesy of Marvel
3. Dr. Doom bio courtesy of Marvel
4. Fantastic Four #5, July 1962
5. Full explanation of how soft body armour works
6. Pneumatic artificial muscles
7. Article outlining recent human exoskeleton developments

The World’s Greatest Detective

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BatmanWith the last instalment of Rocksteady‘s trilogy on the shelves and a new film on the way let’s get topical and stroll over to DC for a spell.

I’m going to digress here somewhat but have many of you had the chance to take Arkham Knight for a spin? I picked up my copy at the GAME midnight launch but my partner actually hijacked it immediately so while I haven’t played much I have watched a fair bit of play through and it’s gorgeous. I won’t launch into a full on review, that’s not really the purpose of this blog, but it was definitely created with the ultimate Batman fantasy in mind. You can glide, brood, fight, dive and drive your way through a gritty, dark Gotham city. The addition of the pimped out Batmobile and the DLC content that make Harley and the Red Hood available is hit and miss; it’s all a matter of personal preference. If you’re a fan of the previous two instalments I would recommend getting your hands on a copy of the studio’s wonderful farewell to Gotham.

Now then, back to the topic at hand, personally the only thing I’m overly fond of from Gotham is Dr. Harleen Frances Quinzel, M.D.[1]Harley Quinn Bio courtesy of DC Frankly though, she’s a bag of crazy that even I don’t want to wade through; psychoanalysis is not enjoyable. So while I may drop in on her and her lady Miss Ivy later to discuss the antitoxin business, today is all about the Dark Knight himself. Batman[2]Batman Bio courtesy of DC is a superhero with a distinct lack of superpowers. There was no accident with a radioactive animal, no cosmic rays or science experiments gone wrong, he keeps the streets clean through nothing more than indomitable willpower and Kevlar fuelled physical prowess. That’s not to say that there’s nothing to talk about concerning the Bat and science. In fact, the man himself said ‘I’ve got to know science thoroughly to become a scientific detective.'[3]Finger, Bill(w) Kane, Bob(p) Schwartz, Lew Sayre(p) Kaye, Stan(i) “How to Be the Batman” Detective Comics Vol 1 #190 [Dec, 1952] Needless to say Mr. Wayne certainly succeeded.

As far as Batman and science is concerned it’s all a technological love affair. He makes up for his distinct lack of superpowers with his wallet, enabling him to equip himself with the finest of gadgets. I’m actually going to roll back time to the good ol’ 1950’s for this and take a look at a few of the bits and pieces in the comics because they entertain me.

For this week we have the portable jet pack. Tired of running around after all those nefarious criminals in Gotham, Batman clearly decided it was about time he had the means to fly between buildings. So was it real life science or just entertaining malarkey? As far as I’m aware this addition was somewhere around the mid 1950’s, a time period in which there were actually a lot of articles kicking around the scientific magazines of the time discussing scientists attempts to develop jet packs. Some of you may already know the name Wendell F. Moore, a scientist of the time who developed a working rocket belt. ‘How did it work?’ I hear you say. Why, through the magic of chemistry of course! I’m going to start throwing out chemical names and sciencey words now so bear with me. The jetpack would have used pressure from liquid nitrogen to force hydrogen peroxide into a catalyst chamber. Here it would have reacted with silver screens coated with samarium nitrate. Mixing all this together would cause a jet of incredibly hot, high-pressured steam to come shooting out the bottom providing thrust.[4]In-depth look into Jet Packs Chemically it all sounds complicated but it’s Balloonactually similar in principle to those super fun rocket balloons; if you blow up a rocket balloon and hold the neck closed the pressure inside the balloon is higher than the pressure outside it, it just doesn’t have anywhere to go because the force is equally spread out (unless you blow it up too enthusiastically, then it’s going to explode in your face). By releasing the neck of the balloon you’re creating an imbalanced force so the air will shoot out the back to try and even things out; thus creating thrust.[5]A fun, simple experiment to demonstrate thrust In a rocket it’s all those fancy chemicals producing the gas and subsequent pressure instead of the spluttering wheezing mess that is a person after blowing up a balloon.

Basically, some poor unsuspecting sod ended up with a high powered rocket strapped to his/her back. Should that poor individual have found themselves with a case of the fidgets then they would have sustained quite the nasty burn from the steam. I like to hope they had incredibly durable legs as well seeing as their pins were the only landing gear available. Factor in the noise levels and the fact it could only hold enough fuel for somewhere in the region of twenty seconds of flight and it’s all very impractical. The pack was scrapped when Moore died but the dream didn’t die there.

Interesting story time. Jump with me to 1992 when three men decided it was time for a rocket revival. Brad Barker, Joe Wright and Larry Stanley founded the American Rocket Belt Corporation to develop their new version of the rocket pack and by ’94 they had a working prototype; the RB 2000 Rocket Belt. They re-jigged Moore’s design using light alloys and composite materials and boosted the fuel capacity resulting in an astounding maximum flight duration of… drum roll please… 30 seconds. In the rocket pack world the RB 2000 was a revelation. Sadly, things went sour. Wright developed an escalating meth addiction, Barker was accused of stealing money and Stanley had had enough. To cut a long story short, Barker beat Stanley pretty viciously and stole their prototype. At some point later down the line, what should debut on TV but the RB 2000. Naturally, Stanley was pissed and convinced Wright to file a joint lawsuit against Barker. This is where things got interesting. Wright was brutally murdered in his own home, Stanley won the lawsuit but Barker fled again. Not willing to give up what he was due Stanley had four men kidnap Barker; he was held captive for eight days in a small box before he managed to escape. Stanley served an eight year sentence and to this day the RB 2000 has never been recovered, which is a shame because it had potential.[6]Full article on “The Jetpack Murder”

The take away from all the rambling is that our Caped Crusader gets a gold star for his feasible use of science and engineering. Go’n yourself DC.

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